‘I Am Yup’ik’ film makes it to Sundance

first_imgAlaska Native Arts & Culture | Arts & Culture | Southwest‘I Am Yup’ik’ film makes it to SundanceDecember 9, 2015 by Lakeidra Chavis, KYUK – Bethel Share:Byron Nicholai in a still from Nathan Golon’s film “I Am Yup’ik.” (Courtesy Sundance Institute)The film “I Am Yup’ik” has made the 2016 Sundance Film Festival lineup, the nonprofit organization announced Tuesday.According to the lineup summary, the short film, directed by Daniele Anastasion and Nathan Golon, is about a 16-year-old Yup’ik Eskimo boy who leaves his village to travel across the snowy isolated tundra. The film chronicles his journey to compete in an all Yup’ik basketball tournament in order to bring pride to his village.The film stars Toksook Bay resident Byron Nicholai, now 17 years old. The high school student received national attention after uploading a song titled “I am Yup’ik” to his Facebook page. The film features other Toksook Bay residents, as well.Anastasion and Golon came to the Kuskokwim area to shoot the movie in Bethel and in surrounding villages, earlier this year in April and May. Washington D.C.-based film company GoodFight Media produced the film. The documentary short is among 72 other short international films that will be showcased at the festival in January.The acclaimed festival began in the late 70s, and highlights independent filmmakers around the world.Share this story:last_img read more

Invasive species haven’t made the Bering Sea their home…yet

first_imgAlaska’s Energy Desk | OceansInvasive species haven’t made the Bering Sea their home…yetFebruary 7, 2018 by Zoë Sobel, Alaska’s Energy Desk Share:European Green Crab. (Public Domain photo courtesy of Washington Sea Grant)Native species are well adapted to living in the challenging environment of the Bering Sea, but increased shipping means there are more opportunities for invasive species to hitch a ride in. And as the waters warm, the ecosystem will become more hospitable making it easier for them to settle.Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2018/02/INVASIVE.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Zoologist Jesika Reimer is part of a team studying the threat.“What we really wanted to do was look at what invasive species have the potential to arrive,” Reimer said. “We wanted to know where should we be looking for them — so, what ports are getting a lot of traffic? And we wanted to know if a species arrives, can it survive?”The reason to focus on the Bering Sea was twofold — first, there aren’t really invasive species there yet and second, it’s one of the largest commercial fisheries in the world and serves as a link to the Arctic.For the past three years, the team at the Alaska Center for Conservation Science has been compiling data to identify the largest threats. At the top of the list researcher Amanda Droghini says are species that are geographically nearby, reproduce quickly, change their environment or are in direct competition with existing species.One of the biggest threats is the European green crab.“The European green crab tends to be a very voracious hungry predator with a high reproductive rate,” Droghini said.While the green crab can survive in the Bering Sea right now, Reimer says it can’t reproduce.“It’s not warm enough for them to have offspring and for those offspring to survive, grow, become adults and go on to reproduce themselves, Reimer said. “But when we do look at the climate models and we look in the future we see that as things are warming up we jump over this threshold where European green crab weren’t able to reproduce, where now it opens up so they can.”Removing invasives once they have taken root is challenging on land, but it is especially difficult in marine environments. So the researchers believe taking a proactive approach will help keep non-native species at bay.Ideally all of Alaska’s coastline would be monitored — scientists would keep tabs of what organisms exist in a given area and look for changes. And Droghini says there is some monitoring right now being done in Dutch Harbor, Nome, and the Pribilof Islands, but the efforts are patchy and dependent on funding.“Without a consistent monitoring program how will we ever be able to detect the species when they arrive?”Droghini said. ” We know that the earlier we detect them the greater chance we have of eradicating them”The next step for the science is fine tuning the modeling to imagine if invasives arrive how they might spread through the Bering Sea and might interact with the existing ecosystem.Without strict international regulations, ships may continue to — knowingly or unknowingly — transport non-native species wherever they travel.The Bering Sea has kept invasives at bay for now, but warming waters look to make it a more welcoming environment in the future.Share this story:last_img read more

Premium / Market Insight: Flexport and its ‘new way forward’…

first_img << Go back The first-ever Flexport conference in Santa Monica, which is due in late September, has been advertised all over the web and social media, but in my marketplace it was a presentation signed off by Dennis Wong – previously at Kuehne + Nagel in Asia, now sales director at Flexport in Hong Kong – that has been doing the rounds in the past few days.It contains some useful nuggets from a private company that doesn’t disclose much about its business.ForwardDated 13 June ... Premium subscriber LOGIN Forgotten your password? Please click here Email* Email* New Premium subscriber REGISTER Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premium By Alessandro Pasetti 17/06/2019 Password* Please Login LOGIN Reset Your Password Please either REGISTER or login below to continue Resetlast_img read more

Understanding opioid addiction to better fight it

first_img Allison Bond Related: Let’s talk about how the introduction to these substances, in many cases, is a legal one.Bharel: To understand how we got to where we are, we need to take a step back 10, 15, 20 years. We need to talk about how we as a society think about calming our inner responses, starting with children. Today, we want quick responses to everything. Within the last couple of decades these very powerful opiates have been introduced, and they are incredible pain relievers.But opioids have become something that could be used not only for acute pain or cancer pain, but for other types of pain as well. They started to be used more for a societal expectation for quick pain relief. We need to balance the need for pain relief with the potential for substance misuse. I’d like to turn now to treatment. One of the things we’ve learned is that treatment can be very difficult. The rates of success with various treatment approaches range widely.Wakeman: We have decades of evidence about substance use treatment. Yet current treatment strategies are more driven by dogma than by evidence. Just like diabetes, [substance use disorder] is a chronic illness, and cure is not the goal. However, you can be in long-term remission, and you can prevent long-term relapse. And we need to work to keep patients addicted to opioids safe while we get their disease under control.A study last year looking at MassHealth patients that compared those on medication treatments with those on abstinence-based treatments found a 50 percent reduction in relapse in those receiving treatment with medication. Just like in HIV, along with efforts along the lines of social justice and lifestyle changes, medications are important in tackling the opioid epidemic.A previous version of this story incorrectly edited one of Wakeman’s comments. The story has been updated. @AllisonRBond About the Author Reprints Related: [email protected] With continued use of opioids, you need to use just to avoid being sick. You shift from needing to use the substance to feel good to needing it just to feel normal. People who are addicted to opioids are literally trying to survive and trying to function. Not having opioids won’t kill you, but it’ll make you feel like you’re going to die.Mnookin: The first time I used heroin was at 10 a.m. on a Sunday morning. I had already been in and out of rehab for other drugs, and with heroin, I went pretty quickly from using in the morning to feel good to trying to figure out what amount would keep me from throwing up on my way to work.The physical need when you are suffering an active addiction is not like anything else I can describe. Another thing that I just want to mention is that your body transitions from an opioid being a substance that causes these desirable effects to it being a substance your body feels like it needs. What eventually happens is you’re using heroin just trying to feel like you’re not drowning.How do medications work to treat addiction?Lukas: People sometimes say, ‘Oh, you’re just trading one addiction for another.” Hogwash! Data have shown that when people are on these meds, emergency room visits and rates of HIV transmission go down. Buprenorphine takes the place of the heroin and eliminates drug-seeking behavior, and you do not have to go to a methadone clinic every day to get your medication. For years, I walked through that line of patients waiting to get methadone on the way to my office. That’s not the way we should be treating our patients.Naloxone is the plastic covering that goes over the electrical outlet. It binds to the opioid receptor, keeping the heroin or morphine from getting to that receptor. You would not give an antagonist like this to someone who’s actively using; it would throw them into withdrawal. Suboxone is buprenorphine with naloxone, so they don’t crush the buprenorphine and inject to get high. Clinicians can now treat up to 275 patients with suboxone in the privacy of their own office. A panel at Boston HUBweek took a look at the opioid crisis and ways to solve it John Moore/Getty Imagescenter_img By Allison Bond Sept. 28, 2016 Reprints Watch: ‘Like you’re living in hell’: A survivor on what opioid withdrawal did to his body With 78 opioid overdoses per day in the United States, experts say opioid addiction constitutes a public health emergency. Developing the best plan of action requires an understanding of the science behind opioid addiction, which was the topic of a panel discussion at HUBweek on Tuesday in Cambridge, Mass.Speaking were Monica Bharel, Massachusetts Department of Public Health commissioner; Sarah Wakeman, medical director of the Substance Use Disorder Initiative at Massachusetts General Hospital; Scott Lukas, director of the Behavioral Psychopharmacology Research Laboratory at McLean Hospital in Belmont; and Seth Mnookin, codirector of MIT’s graduate program in science writing and a former opioid user. STAT senior enterprise reporter David Armstrong led the panel.Here’s an edited version of the discussion.advertisement HealthUnderstanding opioid addiction to better fight it What is it about opioids, compared to other drugs, that make them so desirable?Lukas: Opioids mimic endorphins in the brain, and heroin crosses the blood brain barrier almost instantly. It not only can makes people feel “high,” but it also acts on the spinal cord, the brain, and receptors that affect physical pain and the perception of it. But it also affects receptors in the brain that sense carbon dioxide; that’s the basis of stopping breathing with an opioid overdose.Wakeman: Dopamine tells your brain to pay attention to something, and to want to continue to do something. It’s released by activities like food and sex — things we need to survive. But heroin releases much more dopamine in the brain than these natural triggers. For someone who has developed opioid addiction, who is craving the feelings that opioids cause, everyday things don’t release as much dopamine in comparison, and so you don’t pay attention to other things as much — you ignore things that someone without heroin addiction would find hard to understand not caring about.advertisement It’s time to call the opioid epidemic a public health emergency Tags addictionheroinopioidslast_img read more

Guide For More Sustainable Social Housing

first_imgGuide For More Sustainable Social Housing VIC PremierVictorians can look forward to more sustainable social housing, with the release of a new report that provides practical advice to help housing agencies in their efforts to make housing more energy efficient.Minister for Consumer Affairs Melissa Horne launched the report today, congratulating the author – Community Housing Industry Association (Victoria) – on creating an excellent resource for the sector.The report provides practical information and case studies to help Registered Housing Associations apply for government grants for social housing, and plan for and carry out improvement projects.This is particularly important in 2021, with the Andrews Labor Government providing $5.3 billion to construct more than 12,000 new homes. This includes $1.38 billion for the community housing sector to build 4,200 homes.These new homes will meet 7-star energy efficiency standards, making them more comfortable during summer and winter, and saving tenants on their power bills.The government is also providing $50 million for community housing providers to undertake maintenance and upgrade works on social housing properties they manage, or own, as part of the Building Works package.The new report, Energy Efficiency in the Victorian Community Housing Sector, highlights the benefits of making social housing more energy efficient and captures the lessons learned by housing agencies that participated in the Victorian Property Fund’s 2017-18 environmentally sustainable funding round.The round resulted in $2.7 million of improvements to existing social housing such as installing energy efficient cooling and heating systems, solar panels and battery storage to increase the on-site usage of renewable energy, benefitting over 1400 low-income households.The report shows the opportunities and challenges involved in improving the energy efficiency of existing social housing, helping to reduce future electricity bills and reduce carbon emissions.It was produced thanks to a $100,000 Victorian Property Fund grant to Community Housing Industry Association (Victoria), which played a central role in supporting the sector carry out the improvements and capturing the lessons from the round.The report, case studies and further information can be found at: chiavic.com.au/resources/energy-efficiency-projects/.As stated by Minister for Consumer Affairs, Gaming and Liquor Regulation Melissa Horne“With record funding for new social housing and upgrades, this timely report shows the benefits of energy-efficient social housing – making homes more comfortable and saving tenants money on their energy bills.”“This report gives housing agencies valuable insights into the benefits of making their housing more sustainable, as well as practical tips to carry out this important work.”“The report and case studies are an important contribution towards building the knowledge, skills and capacity of the community housing sector.”As stated by Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change Lily D’Ambrosio“These measures will save people money on their bills and ensure that every Victorian gets to play their part on reducing emissions in their household.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Andrews, AusPol, Australia, carbon emissions, climate change, efficiency, electricity, energy efficiency, environment, environmentally sustainable, gaming, Government, housing, Housing Industry Association, regulation, renewable energy, sustainable, Victorialast_img read more

Registrations essential for Fremantle Anzac Day Dawn Service

first_imgRegistrations essential for Fremantle Anzac Day Dawn Service The City of Fremantle is encouraging people to register early to attend this year’s Anzac Day Dawn Service.After last year’s commemorations were cancelled due to COVID-19, Fremantle will return to marking Anzac Day with the traditional Dawn Service at Monument Hill, followed by a community service in North Fremantle and an Anzac Day march through the heart of the City.Deputy Mayor Andrew Sullivan said while he was delighted people could once again attend Anzac Day events in person, there would still be some COVID-19 restrictions in place.“Anzac Day is one of Fremantle’s most important civic occassions, so we were all very disappointed our events had to be cancelled last year,” Cr Sullivan said.“While we will be able to hold a Dawn Service this year, the state government’s COVID-19 safety guidelines mean Monument Hill will have a maximum capacity of 6000 people and we need people to register beforehand if they want to attend.“We’ll have SafeWA QR codes set up all over the place, so when people arrive it’s important that they scan in using the SafeWA app or check in manually with one of our COVID safety marshals.“Many of the veterans who will attend the Dawn Service are elderly and more vulnerable to COVID-19, so we also remind everyone to adhere to physical distancing requirements and please stay home if you’re feeling sick. “For the first time ever the Dawn Service will also be live streamed on the City’s website and Facebook page, so if we reach our maximum capacity and people miss out they will still be able to see the service and pay their respects at home.”The Fremantle Anzac Day Dawn Service will be held at Monument Hill on Sunday 25 April starting at 5.50am.Registrations are essential. To register click here.To watch the live stream, visit the City of Fremantle website or Facebook page.The North Fremantle service will commence at 9am at the Fallen Soldiers Memorial on the corner of Queen Victoria Street and Harvest Road.The Anzac Day march will start from Pioneer Park opposite Fremantle Station at 10.15am. It will follow a shortened route along the Cappuccino Strip and conclude at Fremantle Oval.Due to COVID-19 safety measures there will be no opening ceremony before the march or closing ceremony afterwards, but spectators are welcome to watch the march along the parade route. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:City of Fremantle, community, community service, covid-19, Day Dawn, Elderly, Facebook, Fremantle, Government, heart, local council, Queen, Safety, Victoria, visit, website, Western Australialast_img read more

Libraries can help with electricity discount

first_imgLibraries can help with electricity discount Latrobe City Council Libraries are leading the charge to help people on a Pensioner Concession Card and some Health Care Cards to access the Victorian Government’s $250 electricity bonus.To obtain the grant, people need an original PDF (electronic copy) or a hard-copy version of their electricity bill and a Centrelink Reference Number (CRN) – which is found on your concession card – or your Department of Veterans Affairs card number to submit through the State Government’s Compare Energy website.Latrobe Libraries can assist eligible recipients to scan in the required documents and walk them through the application process using library computers.“During COVID restrictions the Library staff responded to the needs of our community and again, that is what they are doing,” Latrobe City Council Mayor, Cr Sharon Gibson said.The electricity bonus is a once-only $250 power saving bonus and is available to eligible people from now until the end of the year. The bonus is available to holders and recipients of a:Pensioner Concession CardJobseekerYouth AllowanceAusStudyAbStudyDVA pensionerDVA Gold cards /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:community, council, electricity, energy, Gibson, gold, Government, health, Latrobe, Latrobe City, Latrobe City Council, local council, veterans, Victoria, website, Youthlast_img read more

CU-Boulder Situation Comedy Class To Perform In Front Of Live Audience

first_img Published: March 5, 2001 On March 10-11, 36 university students enrolled in a situation comedy course will perform and video tape an episode of NBC’s popular show “Friends” before a live audience at CU-Boulder’s Irey Stage in the University Theatre. This is the class’s third year but the first time a show will be taped in front of an audience. Taping on Saturday is scheduled from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. The public is invited to watch the show. The episode, titled “The One Where No One’s Ready,” is an Emmy award winning episode that takes place entirely in the apartment of characters Monica and Rachel and has no guest player. All of that went into consideration when Art Annecharico, the situation comedy course’s adjunct professor, selected it from several “Friends” scripts. “I chose this script because it is a simple, yet beautifully written and funny script, and just a delight to perform,” said Annecharico. Annecharico started the class because CU didn’t have courses that taught production on dialogue and he wanted to give the students a real sense of how sit-coms are produced in Hollywood.”Every step that we take is just like the steps that would be taken in L.A.,” he said. Students taking the class are from the School of Journalism and the departments of film studies and theatre and dance. Each student has a part in the episode. There are six actors, three directors, two producers, an art director and six cameramen. The other students are responsible for setting up camera positions, building set props, lighting and discussing how the show should run. Annecharico, a 36-year veteran of the entertainment industry, is a two-time Emmy Award winner and has won six Laurel Awards for his work in advertising. He was the CEO and founder of The Arthur Co., which he sold to MCA in 1994 before retiring and moving to Colorado. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

Chief Justice orders changes to state court COVID-19 guidelines including local flexibility in returning to in-person jury trials

first_imgChief Justice orders changes to state court COVID-19 guidelines including local flexibility in returning to in-person jury trials Jun 17, 2020 Top Stories Chief Justice Charles Canady issued two new administrative orders and a new “best practices” memorandum June 16 adopting changes to guidelines for state court pandemic operations recommended by his COVID-19 Workgroup. They include a new provision letting individual counties or local trial-court circuits return to in-person jury trials at different times based on local conditions.The first new administrative order updates one originally issued April 6, 2020, providing comprehensive guidelines for state court operations in the pandemic. As amended, it now permits local variations in a return to jury proceedings and replaces an earlier blanket statewide suspension of jury trials through at least July 17.Under the order, local chief judges now can remove the suspension of jury trials locally 30 days after determining that the trial-court circuit or a county within the circuit has transitioned to Phase 2 operations.The second new administrative order updates one originally issued May 21, 2020, providing guidelines for state courts to move into Phase 2. As defined in the order, Phase 2 is when limited in-person contact is authorized for certain purposes in the state courts and may require protective measures.Phase 3 is when in-person contact is more broadly authorized in the state courts with more relaxed protective measures. Phase 4 is when COVID-19 no longer presents a significant risk to public health and safety in the state courts.The new memorandum updates one originally issued May 11, 2020, on “best practices” recommended for state court operations by the COVID-19 Workgroup. It includes new guidelines on jury management in the pandemic, a recommended priority for resuming civil and criminal jury trials once they are authorized, and management of trial evidence during remote pretrial hearings in criminal cases.The COVID-19 Workgroup is charged in part with updating these guidelines continuously as pandemic conditions change and as new information about COVID-19 is developed by health authorities. It will continue to meet and advise the  chief justice at least through December 31.One of its duties is to recommend which changes made during the pandemic should be continued in state court operations after the pandemic ends.The workgroup was first created in an April 21, 2020, order. That order and other emergency orders and advisories are being linked on the Florida Supreme Court’s website: https://www.floridasupremecourt.org/Emergencylast_img read more

Scott in the mix through 36 at Aussie PGA

first_imgGOLD COAST, Australia – Adam Scott put together back-to-back rounds of 68 and feels like he’s really back in the swing of things as he heads into the weekend at the Australian PGA Championship four shots off the pace. Andrew Dodt followed his opening 65 with a 67 on Friday to hold the halfway lead at 12 under, two shots ahead of fellow Australian Ashley Hall and four clear of Scott and New Zealander Ryan Fox, who share third place. Harold Varner III had a long, eventful morning before finishing before lunch at 7 under — good enough to hold up for outright fifth after two rounds. He was up 2:45 a.m., finished his first round in a share of the lead after a 65, and took the lead early in the second round before back-to-back double-bogeys on his sixth and seventh holes — the 15th and 16th holes at Royal Pines Resort. He picked up birdies on three of his last five holes for an even-par second round of 72. Scott had an afternoon start on Friday and only had to focus on his second round. Half the field had to get up before dawn for a 5:30 a.m. tee off to finish off the first round which was postponed late Thursday because of lightning and rain. Ian Poulter was among them, getting up at 3:30 — something he’s never had to do in 17 years on the tour. The 40-year-old Englishman had a 68 in his second round and was 4 under for the tournament. Scott, who spent time on the Gold Coast while growing up in Queensland, known as Australia’s Sunshine State, didn’t think it was too much of a hardship for the rest of the field. “You get up at 5 anyway here in Queensland,” the former world No. 1 said.. “I felt like a sleep in.” Scott had five birdies and a bogey on Friday, and was hitting most greens with ease, “making it fairly stress free.” “It’s the best I’ve hit in a few weeks,” said Scott, who had slow starts at the Australian Open and at the World Cup of Golf last month. “It was nice to find it. I haven’t had that crisp stroke through the ball for two weeks. “I’ve been very cautious not to hit it too far off line — I was in a spot today where I could trust it.” Dodt finished with a bogey on the 18th on Friday after a previously blemish-free round. “I hit the green on the last, but unfortunately rushed my first putt and then missed the one coming back. So it was a frustrating way to finish … but I’m not going to beat myself up about it too badly.” Hall finished runner-up to Jordan Spieth at the Australian Open at Royal Sydney last month, saying the result saved him from having to go out and get a job to support his family. He finished with a 65 in the first round, waking up at 3:17 a.m. to make it to the early start, and went through the second round in 69. “It was a record — 3.17 isn’t really a good time to wake up but everyone else did it,” he said. After starting on the back nine, Hall was down to 11 under before a triple bogey 7 at the 412-meter 4th hole. “I was kind of cruising along before a little speed hump, but I got it back in the end,” Hall said. “I hit it right off the tee. It was a pretty bad shot actually. It hit the cart path and ended up in the hazard. Took a drop backward a little bit to try and hit the shot over the tree and in the bunker and 3-putted from there.”last_img read more