Why scientists should learn to fail, fast and often

first_img Tags academic publishingnegative findings Why scientists should learn to fail, fast and often What is it? Silicon Valley runs on failure. Its unofficial motto, after all, is “Fail fast, fail often,” and it is the region that gave birth to FailCon, where stories of entrepreneurial failure are badges of honor.That’s more than just cute marketing. As the New Yorker’s James Surowiecki has written, “In the delusions of entrepreneurs are the seeds of technological progress.” Failures, in other words, are not only acceptable, but beneficial. By Adam Marcus and Ivan Oransky May 12, 2016 Reprints What’s included? Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Log In | Learn More Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Alex Hogan/STAT, APStock GET STARTED The Watchdogs last_img read more

Vermont poised to become first state to require pharma to justify pricing

first_img Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. PharmalotVermont poised to become first state to require pharma to justify pricing Related: Andy Duback/AP Related: Among the states where bills have been introduced, with varying degrees of success, are California, Massachusetts, Virginia, Oregon, and North Carolina. And New York Governor Andrew Cuomo included similar language earlier this year in his annual budget proposal.The Vermont legislation, however, appears to be the closest to becoming law.advertisement Once that process is completed, the state attorney general must contact each drug maker to obtain justification for the price increases. The companies would have to submit information concerning all factors that contributed to the price hikes, including detailed cost breakdowns. Ultimately, this information would be collected in a report and posted on a public web site. Each violation carries a $10,000 penalty.It’s not clear, though, what else the state might do with the information. But one Vermont legislator, who was active in pushing the legislation, believes that disclosure, by itself, may eventually force the pharmaceutical industry to reconcile its pricing with public explanations about its own costs.“Transparency is the first step in getting prices under control,” said Chris Pearson, the vice chair of the House health committee, who expects Shumlin to sign the bill. “I don’t think this bill will lower prices next year, but hopefully it will get other states to pass similar laws and pressure Congress to act.” In less than a month, Vermont could become the first state in the country to require drug makers to justify price hikes on their medicines, a move that may prompt others to take similar action but also spark a battle with the pharmaceutical industry.A bill that would force companies to explain their pricing recently passed the legislature, but must still be signed by Governor Peter Shumlin. A spokesman for the governor said he is expected to take action on all recently passed bills by June 9, but that a review was not completed and so he otherwise declined to comment.The development comes amid mounting furor over prescription drug costs. Several states have responded by proposing legislation that requires drug companies to either reveal their costs or explain their pricing. These demands reflect industry arguments that rising prices reflect rising R&D costs.advertisement Tags drug pricespharmaceutical industryprescription drugs He believes that the language in the bill is troublesome, because it is “virtually impossible” to comply with what he described as an “open-ended” requirement for companies to provide all of the relevant information and documents to justify price hikes. He added that there is also a “long history of disputes” about the precise meaning of “wholesale acquisition cost,” which is industry lingo for list prices.“The mix of an ill-defined and ambiguous reporting obligation with the potential for large penalties for noncompliance is a toxic combination,” said Matthews.There is one portion of the bill, however, that pleases the pharmaceutical industry. Insurers will be required to give the state information on their formularies — the list of preferred drugs for which coverage is provided — cost sharing, and various tactics used to manage the use of medicines. These include prior authorization, which is when an insurer must first approve the use of a prescription drug.A spokeswoman for the America’s Health Insurance Plans told us that most insurers already provide this information to state regulators. The bill would require state officials to identify 15 drugs for which “significant health care dollars” are spent, and where list prices rose by 50 percent or more over the previous five-year period. Alternatively, they must identify list prices for 15 medicines that rose 15 percent or more over a 12-month period. More drug makers are taking hefty price hikes on more drugs [email protected] Could financing health care like a home hold down drug costs? Privacy Policy By Ed Silverman May 19, 2016 Reprints Please enter a valid email address. Leave this field empty if you’re human: A spokeswoman for the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, the industry trade group, wrote us that the bill is misguided and “disappointing,” because it “accepts the false notion that spending on medicines is the primary driver of growth in health care costs” and “ignores savings that medicines provide to the health care system.”If the Vermont bill does become law, drug companies can be expected to push back, according to James Matthews, a partner at the Foley & Lardner law firm, who has defended drug makers in litigation over wholesale pricing matters.“Some companies will resist turning over this information because it looks at the most important business metrics that they don’t want to share with the world,” Matthews said. Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin About the Author Reprints Ed Silverman @Pharmalot Newsletters Sign up for Pharmalot Your daily update on the drug industry.last_img read more

Understanding opioid addiction to better fight it

first_img Allison Bond Related: Let’s talk about how the introduction to these substances, in many cases, is a legal one.Bharel: To understand how we got to where we are, we need to take a step back 10, 15, 20 years. We need to talk about how we as a society think about calming our inner responses, starting with children. Today, we want quick responses to everything. Within the last couple of decades these very powerful opiates have been introduced, and they are incredible pain relievers.But opioids have become something that could be used not only for acute pain or cancer pain, but for other types of pain as well. They started to be used more for a societal expectation for quick pain relief. We need to balance the need for pain relief with the potential for substance misuse. I’d like to turn now to treatment. One of the things we’ve learned is that treatment can be very difficult. The rates of success with various treatment approaches range widely.Wakeman: We have decades of evidence about substance use treatment. Yet current treatment strategies are more driven by dogma than by evidence. Just like diabetes, [substance use disorder] is a chronic illness, and cure is not the goal. However, you can be in long-term remission, and you can prevent long-term relapse. And we need to work to keep patients addicted to opioids safe while we get their disease under control.A study last year looking at MassHealth patients that compared those on medication treatments with those on abstinence-based treatments found a 50 percent reduction in relapse in those receiving treatment with medication. Just like in HIV, along with efforts along the lines of social justice and lifestyle changes, medications are important in tackling the opioid epidemic.A previous version of this story incorrectly edited one of Wakeman’s comments. The story has been updated. @AllisonRBond About the Author Reprints Related: [email protected] With continued use of opioids, you need to use just to avoid being sick. You shift from needing to use the substance to feel good to needing it just to feel normal. People who are addicted to opioids are literally trying to survive and trying to function. Not having opioids won’t kill you, but it’ll make you feel like you’re going to die.Mnookin: The first time I used heroin was at 10 a.m. on a Sunday morning. I had already been in and out of rehab for other drugs, and with heroin, I went pretty quickly from using in the morning to feel good to trying to figure out what amount would keep me from throwing up on my way to work.The physical need when you are suffering an active addiction is not like anything else I can describe. Another thing that I just want to mention is that your body transitions from an opioid being a substance that causes these desirable effects to it being a substance your body feels like it needs. What eventually happens is you’re using heroin just trying to feel like you’re not drowning.How do medications work to treat addiction?Lukas: People sometimes say, ‘Oh, you’re just trading one addiction for another.” Hogwash! Data have shown that when people are on these meds, emergency room visits and rates of HIV transmission go down. Buprenorphine takes the place of the heroin and eliminates drug-seeking behavior, and you do not have to go to a methadone clinic every day to get your medication. For years, I walked through that line of patients waiting to get methadone on the way to my office. That’s not the way we should be treating our patients.Naloxone is the plastic covering that goes over the electrical outlet. It binds to the opioid receptor, keeping the heroin or morphine from getting to that receptor. You would not give an antagonist like this to someone who’s actively using; it would throw them into withdrawal. Suboxone is buprenorphine with naloxone, so they don’t crush the buprenorphine and inject to get high. Clinicians can now treat up to 275 patients with suboxone in the privacy of their own office. A panel at Boston HUBweek took a look at the opioid crisis and ways to solve it John Moore/Getty Imagescenter_img By Allison Bond Sept. 28, 2016 Reprints Watch: ‘Like you’re living in hell’: A survivor on what opioid withdrawal did to his body With 78 opioid overdoses per day in the United States, experts say opioid addiction constitutes a public health emergency. Developing the best plan of action requires an understanding of the science behind opioid addiction, which was the topic of a panel discussion at HUBweek on Tuesday in Cambridge, Mass.Speaking were Monica Bharel, Massachusetts Department of Public Health commissioner; Sarah Wakeman, medical director of the Substance Use Disorder Initiative at Massachusetts General Hospital; Scott Lukas, director of the Behavioral Psychopharmacology Research Laboratory at McLean Hospital in Belmont; and Seth Mnookin, codirector of MIT’s graduate program in science writing and a former opioid user. STAT senior enterprise reporter David Armstrong led the panel.Here’s an edited version of the discussion.advertisement HealthUnderstanding opioid addiction to better fight it What is it about opioids, compared to other drugs, that make them so desirable?Lukas: Opioids mimic endorphins in the brain, and heroin crosses the blood brain barrier almost instantly. It not only can makes people feel “high,” but it also acts on the spinal cord, the brain, and receptors that affect physical pain and the perception of it. But it also affects receptors in the brain that sense carbon dioxide; that’s the basis of stopping breathing with an opioid overdose.Wakeman: Dopamine tells your brain to pay attention to something, and to want to continue to do something. It’s released by activities like food and sex — things we need to survive. But heroin releases much more dopamine in the brain than these natural triggers. For someone who has developed opioid addiction, who is craving the feelings that opioids cause, everyday things don’t release as much dopamine in comparison, and so you don’t pay attention to other things as much — you ignore things that someone without heroin addiction would find hard to understand not caring about.advertisement It’s time to call the opioid epidemic a public health emergency Tags addictionheroinopioidslast_img read more

Solicitor general recommends Supreme Court rule on biosimilars case

first_img Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED What’s included? Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. @Pharmalot About the Author Reprints Pharmalot Log In | Learn More By Ed Silverman Dec. 8, 2016 Reprints GET STARTED Tags legalpharmaceuticalspolicySTAT+center_img What is it? In a development with widespread implications for health care costs, the US solicitor general recommended that the US Supreme Court review a heated dispute over a rule that will determine when lower-cost biosimilar medicines can be launched. And the solicitor general also took a position that may provide a boost to biosimilar manufacturers.At issue is the ability of brand-name drug makers to delay the introduction of biosimilars, which are highly identical versions of expensive biologics, but are expected to cost less. Ed Silverman Solicitor general recommends Supreme Court rule on biosimilars case Alex Hogan/STAT [email protected] Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.last_img read more

With $10 million at stake, scientists compete to build a ‘Star Trek’-style medical tricorder

first_imgFor now, that seems some way off. The working designs by Basil Leaf Technologies, a Pennsylvania-based medical device startup, and the Dynamical Biomarkers Group (DBG), a research group out of the National Central University in Taiwan, are still somewhat bulky and accompanied by lots of little doodads. But as sensor technology improves, it’s not hard to imagine wireless electrodes stuck to our bodies or wired into our implants, keeping running tabs on our health.Searching for indicatorsSequestered away in a computer-filled basement of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, the DBG has a team of 40 people working on their tricorder project. Using decades-old patient data from the hospital, and current clinical trials in Taiwan, the team had been steadily tweaking and evaluating its design.On a desk in the lab sits their most recent prototype, a nondescript, eggshell-colored box about the size of a toaster oven. A smart phone sits in a hub on top. Drawers on three sides open to reveal compartments holding various fobs and attachments. With them, the device measures heart rate, blood pressure, and other vital signs, wirelessly sending the readings to the smart phone.In its most recent round of testing, which took place in 2015, X Prize evaluators tested the gadget’s ability to diagnose 10 required conditions: Anemia, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, elevated white blood cell count, pneumonia, middle ear infection, sleep apnea, and urinary tract infection. Competitors also had the option of diagnosing the absence of those core conditions and for the presence of additional conditions, such as melanoma, mononucleosis, or shingles. Related: Related: That’s not quite the gadget Dr. McCoy made famous. For one thing, the real-life versions being developed now aren’t no-touch wands but rather what look like iPads with associated sensors — electrodes, cuffs, probes, and clips — linked with or without wires.But it’s also intended for a different user: Not a doctor, but rather the patient him or herself. The tricorder, then, is more akin to the “quantified self” trend — gathering all manner of data, on an ongoing basis, to “allow individuals to incorporate health knowledge and decision-making into their daily lives,” the prize website says.advertisement In the LabWith $10 million at stake, scientists compete to build a ‘Star Trek’-style medical tricorder By Leah Samuel Feb. 21, 2017 Reprints “Smart” thread could pluck diagnostic data from your stitches center_img Now the finalists’ devices are in the consumer-testing stage, which began in December. For this stage, a coordinator trains consumers to use the device. Afterward, consumers get a 90-minute session in which they independently use the device to diagnose themselves.One goal of the competition is to raise the possibility of more precise diagnoses. Dr. Andrew Ahn, DBG’s lead medical advisor, suggested that the use of dynamic biomarkers — ongoing readings of vital functions — could improve medical treatment.“Right now, medicine is based on one-time readings,” he said. “But the science of medicine needs to be able to work with continuous data.”He added that the way that a vital sign changes over a period of minutes or hours can be more meaningful than individual readings taken weeks or months apart. This is the “hidden data” of medical diagnosis, said DBG team leader Chung-Kang Peng.“There could be all kinds of hidden indicators we’ve been missing,” agreed David Sept, a University of Michigan professor of biomedical engineering, who is not involved with DBG or X Prize. “You could collect a large, complex dataset of vital signs that might be an indication of something.” The seven best high-tech health-and-wellness gadgets from CES The Dynamical Biomarkers Group’s working model of a tricorder. Chung-Kang Peng Fifty years ago, the “Star Trek” series envisioned a handheld medical device that could diagnose every condition with just a swipe over the patient’s body. The tricorder was just one of the show’s futuristic gadgets — but it’s one that real-world scientists seized upon.And some have spent years working to bring it to existence, under the banner of the Qualcomm Tricorder X Prize, a competition launched in 2012. From a starting roster of over 300 teams, just two are now in the running.The competition has just a few rules: Each prototype must have the capacity to monitor five vital signs and diagnose medical conditions, send data to the internet, and weigh under five pounds.advertisement Sept cautions, however, that more data does not mean better information.“It might be that only one or two specific factors are correlative to a specific disease state,” he said, adding that having the capacity to take many and varied measurements does not mean it’s always useful to do so.Sept added that the technology might not take medicine far enough beyond what it does already. “Correlations [between indicators and diagnoses] can be extremely useful without a showing a direct causative effect,” he said. “But we’re still not predicting causation.”Sept likes the idea of competitions like the X Prize, however.“They do seem to get people to innovate in great ways,” he said, “so I see it as a worthwhile endeavor.”After refining the requirements and extending the deadline last year, X Prize plans to pay out its grand prize of $10 million in April.Win or lose, Team DBG hopes to continue developing its prototype. But whether the device would ever be commercialized is still up in the air. The Food and Drug Administration has been offering advice to help teams prepare for potential FDA review post-competition. But X Prize did not require or conduct clinical trials of the devices, so the designers may also have to clear that hurdle with an FDA-approved trial.For now, Ahn said, “Our primary goal is to enhance health and empower patients… It’s an exciting time to be working on this.”last_img read more

What pricing controversy? Pharma’s reputation is actually improving

first_img Ed Silverman What is it? By Ed Silverman June 1, 2017 Reprints GET STARTED Despite being demonized over its pricing, a new survey released this week finds the pharmaceutical industry actually enjoys a strong reputation among most people.Using a formula that relies on ranking several different attributes — innovation, performance, leadership, citizenship, governance, workplace, and products and services — the industry received a grade of 71.8, a notable 3.5 point improvement from last year and its best showing in five years. And of eight countries canvassed, drug makers received their best reviews from folks in the U.S. Tags drug pricingpharmaceuticalsSTAT+ [email protected] What pricing controversy? Pharma’s reputation is actually improving Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. What’s included?center_img About the Author Reprints Log In | Learn More Pharmalot Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. The rankings are composed of the average of all companies, not an evaluation of the entire industry. Kristoffer Tripplaar/Sipa/AP @Pharmalot Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTEDlast_img read more

Former Insys reps plead guilty to bribing docs for opioid prescribing; they wanted ‘money’ and ‘dark chocolate’

first_img Ed Silverman What is it? By Ed Silverman July 12, 2017 Reprints Log In | Learn More GET STARTED Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED [email protected] STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Richard Hollawellcenter_img Pharmalot About the Author Reprints Former Insys reps plead guilty to bribing docs for opioid prescribing; they wanted ‘money’ and ‘dark chocolate’ What’s included? Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Two former sales reps pleaded guilty on Tuesday to bribing doctors in exchange for prescribing the powerful Subsys painkiller sold by Insys Therapeutics, which is under numerous investigations by state and federal authorities for its role in the opioid epidemic.In both instances, the sales reps pleaded guilty to violating the federal anti-kickback law for participating in a speaker program that prosecutors say was used to reward doctors and other medical practitioners for prescribing Subsys, which contains fentanyl and carries a high risk of dependency. @Pharmalot Tags addictionpharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

Why President Trump recoils from denouncing his ‘alt-right’ supporters

first_img Tags Donald Trumpmental healthpolicyWhite House Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. State of (Trump’s) Mind [email protected] Sharon Begley Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What is it? President Trump’s refusal to unequivocally denounce white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and white nationalists who chanted racist and anti-Semitic slogans in Charlottesville, Va., last weekend, and to assert instead on Tuesday that “there is blame on both sides,” led to widespread condemnation. What it did not do was surprise psychologists.They see two forces in play. Trump responds to criticism and the damage it does to his self-esteem by lashing out, including by taking an extreme position that is as much as possible at odds with his critics’. And he (perhaps unconsciously) recoils from undercutting his supporters because that would implicitly call into question their judgment, which includes voting for him. By Sharon Begley Aug. 18, 2017 Reprints About the Author Reprints Why President Trump recoils from denouncing his ‘alt-right’ supporters GET STARTED Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED @sxbegle What’s included? Log In | Learn More last_img read more

With its stock in a slump, Moderna makes the case for its big-money valuation

first_img [email protected] With its stock in a slump, Moderna makes the case for its big-money valuation Biotech @damiangarde Ruby Wallau for STAT SAN FRANCISCO — Moderna Therapeutics had record-setting success raising money from private investors, but the much-discussed biotech has struggled to convince the public markets of its industry-upending potential, and its stock price has slumped nearly 30 percent in the weeks following what was biotech’s largest-ever initial public offering.That left Moderna CEO Stéphane Bancel, speaking before a standing-room crowd at the industry’s premiere gathering on Tuesday, with a curious task: convincing investors that his $5 billion company is actually undervalued. National Biotech Reporter Damian covers biotech, is a co-writer of The Readout newsletter, and a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. About the Author Reprints By Damian Garde Jan. 8, 2019 Reprints Damian Gardecenter_img Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the biotech sector — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. GET STARTED What’s included? Log In | Learn More Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What is it? Tags biotechnologyBostonlast_img read more

Hedge fund investing $100 million in Harvard drug research

first_imgIn the Lab Log In | Learn More Researchers at Harvard University who want to take drug discoveries from the lab to the market may soon get an infusion of cash.The university plans to announce a partnership Wednesday with Deerfield Management, a health care hedge fund firm that has pledged $100 million to invest in promising potential drugs. Jonathan Saltzman — Boston Globe STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Hedge fund investing $100 million in Harvard drug research What is it? Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprints By Jonathan Saltzman — Boston Globe March 13, 2019 Reprints What’s included? Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED GET STARTED Lisa Poole/AP Tags Bostondrug developmentresearchSTAT+last_img read more